Leveraging LinkedIn for Publishers

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Publishers are pursuing any number of digital avenues for supplementary revenue or increased exposure. Social media is by far proving to be one of the most useful and lucrative of those opportunities to leverage. In particular, LinkedIn is one of the strongest social media choices to use when it comes to business use for publications.

LinkedIn is one of the four largest social media channels used, but when it comes to using social media for business, it is often overlooked. That likely spawns from LinkedIn being less of a social arena and more of a networking space. It is for that reason that it is actually a great option for publishers, and why 91% of executives rate LinkedIn first when it comes to consuming social media content.

When it comes to leveraging LinkedIn, the first thing to know is that publishers should not be using it for “social selling.” Social selling is the equivalent of targeting a distinct segment of social media users, establishing rapport with them, and then nurturing those individuals as leads for your sales funnel. While it is a common practice for businesses leveraging social media, it is not the best direction for publishers. Instead, publishers should be using LinkedIn as an outlet and establishing a digital presence through what they do best, publishing content.

Leveraging LinkedIn for publishers is not as easy as flipping a light switch, but there are some tried and true steps to help publishers pursue the opportunity.

  1. Build the profile to focus on “how you can help” and not “what you do.” LinkedIn started out as an employment and network space, and it still leans heavily that way. People can figure out what a publisher does from their website and publication. The profile should instead focus on what kind of content the publisher provides, and how that content is of benefit to the viewer.
  2. Balance content to be mostly informational with a hint of promotional. People can handle a little bit of self-promotion and pushing towards “loyal readership.” That said, like any content outlet, readers want value out of what they read. For every one piece focused on promotion or “selling,” do 10 pieces of value.
  3. Be frequent and be unique. A paper or magazine with inconsistent publishing does not normally have traction with readers. It does not matter what medium of delivery; that rings true for digital content publishing as well. In the same vein, putting the same content everywhere may give each story more reach, but it does not provide nearly as much value for each outlet. Keep content coming on a schedule, and make sure at least half the LinkedIn content is unique to the channel.
  4. If publishing on LinkedIn, keep the reader on LinkedIn. Like any 3rd party outlet, LinkedIn’s primary goal is to keep users on their channel. That means anything that would push a reader to leave LinkedIn is going to get less results. Also, every social channel has an algorithm that also determines what content gets more or less emphasis. Play to the algorithm’s settings and keep the reader on LinkedIn, and good results are sure to follow.

There are plenty of other useful tips and tools to master LinkedIn for business, but when it comes to a publisher’s starting to leverage it, these four steps should set a strong foundation.

Further Information

To learn more about LinkedIn for publishers, click here. For more information about LinkedIn tips for stronger digital presence, click here.

If you would like more great content from Publication Printers and the Publication Printers Marketing Group, click here.

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Magazines Still Need Print: The Facts

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Print is alive and well, despite the abundance of whispers still asking the question. Over the past decade, the magazine industry has seen huge shifts in business, due to innovations in online and digital media. However, no matter how big the shift has been, print remains vital to the industry, and will continue to be for the foreseeable future. Here are the reasons why!

Revenue matters, and print is still the breadwinner:

Advertisements from print were responsible for over $16 billion in revenue in 2016 (PricewaterhouseCoopers, commonly PwC). Around 87% of revenue related to circulation that year was also coming from print products.

Digital publishing has allowed for lower start-up costs for new publications, but the stream of revenue is not there for most. Only a select few, with the right niche topics and an abundance of alternative revenue streams (subscription video, social media advertising, tiered content strategies, other products, etc.) have found themselves extremely profitable with an all-digital publication. Most end up closing shop or integrating print just to balance the scale.

That said, to quote the president of Meredith’s National Media Group: “… print and digital; not print or digital. In today’s industry, balancing both is the key to success.

Data for print ROI has come a long way:

One of the biggest appeals of digital marketing and advertising is the ability to track information on a very precise level, or it used to be. With so many fake accounts and bots and other mechanisms, digital analytics related to sales or chain-of-purchase, or even just page views, is now incredibly hard to make accurate.

This does not change the fact that realistic data can be a huge asset. That is why so many publishers have worked to develop data algorithms that help prove ROI, track actual chain of purchase, and other vital details specific to print publications … and it is now a reality.

Bauer Media is one of the leaders pioneering print data analytics. Their software provides research data about advertisement and readership as a whole to help show advertisers how ads can help them meet their goals. The result is that Bauer makes ¾ of its revenue from print, and is thriving in today’s market.

Frequency and newsstand dates make a difference:

Digital publications, and online content producers in general suffer from online audiences expecting constant, consistent new stuff. As publishers strain to pump out content, they shift their focus from quality to quantity.

Print publications have a much lighter expectation for content, with weekly, monthly, quarterly, or even annual releases being perfectly normal. Not to mention, the slight variations in how often, and when it goes to actually producing the publication, can make a huge difference in dollars.

Vanity Fair is a great example of this. They combined December and January issues into a “holiday” issue, and also fused July and August to make a “summer” issue. This adjusted their schedule in the newsstands by just a few days, but meant saving a lot of money in printing costs. It also allowed them to have a flexible issue that they release in February related to the award show. It is not part of the normal print schedule, so it can fit in wherever is most affordable for their printer.

For digital publications, adjusting distribution makes little to no monetary change outside of the cost to produce content within a certain timeframe, and the staff needed to do it.

Further Information

For more detail on these facts about print and more, click here. You can also check out this article about 4 major reasons print is still around in a digital age.

If you would like more great content from Publication Printers and the Publication Printers Marketing Group, click here.

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