Why Online Editions Matter!

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Online editions are not just a virtual version of your print publication. They are a major opportunity for advertising dollars and subscription profits, and they also provide your audience with the access they expect. Print is and should be the focus for niche publishers, but not making use of online editions is the same as leaving blank ad spaces in the print; it is losing money you should make.

Sidenote about online editions and publishing content online

Before going into more, there is a huge point that needs to be made clear. Online editions and posting your content as unique articles on a website are not mutually exclusive. In fact, doing both is highly recommended. This is because online editions are their own entity, in the same way the printed publication is a standalone entity. All the contents, the advertising, and everything related to monetizing it is inside the online edition. When you take individual content out of the print or online edition and publish it on a website, that too becomes its own entity, which can have completely different advertisements and audiences. The more forms of distribution you have of the same information, the more audiences you can develop and the more ad spaces you have to leverage.

Now to online editions!

It is like having two publications instead of one

Your print publication has a specific circulation and distribution. You print it, organize it by who it goes to or where it needs to go, it gets shipped, and then it arrives. At that point, people read it and enjoy it and you have done your job. The online edition offers the same. The only difference is that the “who” the circulation goes to and the “distribution” to that circulation are different.

The who for an online edition can have the same demographic and geographic audience as the print, but the difference is where they are looking for content. Print readers want print. Some may also enjoy the digital option, but most seek the print for a reason; they prefer it. That means that, if you are only doing a print publication, you are missing half of your ideal audience. Having an online edition, even if it is 100% identical to the print, will immediately increase your circulation and help you reach even more of your ideal audience.

Also, online editions do not have to be carbon -copies of their printed counterparts. Sure, they will likely share a lot of editorials. They will likely share a cover. Even the non-editorial content, like an editor’s note or house ad, will likely be the same. However, you can run different covers (which you can charge for), different internal ads, and even unique content specific to either the online edition or the print. Essentially, if you want, you can have two publications, each distributed on a different medium, that share enough to make it easy on the publisher, but differ enough that you can sell them as unique from one another.

Start selling subscriptions without changing the “free print” concept

At the end of the day, publishers are publishing for two reasons: to inform the audience, and to make money. The content takes care of the informing part, so that just leaves the making money part. Advertisements are the most functional and lucrative option, but subscriptions are equally as viable. Now that does not mean they will replace ads as the means to keep a publication afloat, but it does mean they can pad the bottom line. The problem is that with the internet and the demand for content by all audiences, many publishers decided to rely on ads alone, and give away the publication for free.

Problem is not entirely the right word. There is nothing wrong with a publication that does not charge a circulation. However, it does mean not making money when you could be. Also, once you give it away for free, it becomes very difficult to shift to charging for it down the road … at least on the same medium. As stated earlier, print and online editions of a publication are separate entities. One is a physical commodity with content “X.” The other is a virtual commodity with content “Y.” If you make them differ just enough, or you provide uniqueness in the form of medium-specific content or covers or ads, they can be “sold” as different publications.

If the print is free to receive, keep it that way. For the luxury of accessing the content through an online edition, charge a subscription or membership registration fee. Or create an online edition application for mobile use and charge for it. Either option allows you to monetize the publication without jeopardizing a current situation where a publication is free.

Creating an online edition is incredibly easy

Two of the biggest concerns for a publisher are time and money. With all the time and money focused on the print, how can you dedicate more towards an online edition? The first reason to do so is profits. You spend money to make money, and investing in an online edition can bring in profits. You just need to make sure you approach it correctly. That is where time is a factor. Even with a majority, if not all of the online edition, being shared with the print publication, it takes time to upload and edit and moderate and all the other factors.

So take it out-of-house. There are any number of softwares that make creating an online edition easy. Most offer a hands-on package where you provide the final file, and they handle the rest. In fact, almost all commercial magazine printers have partnerships with an online editing software. This means you can get your print and online editions from the same people, and often get a discount on one by also doing the other. Publication Printers Corp. has an entire team that handles digital editions and handles the labor for you.

If you don’t have online editions yet, ask yourself these questions. Why am I passing up the opportunity for easy profits? Do I want to reach my entire niche audience, not just the print-readers? Who do I already work with that can do it for me?

Further Information

To learn more about getting value out of your online editions, click here.

If you want more great content from Publication Printers, click here.

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Combatting The Top Assumption about Digital

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Digital is one of the biggest topics for publishers and has been for the better part of two decades. It makes sense, with the advent of the internet, the smartphone, and mobile devices all moving a majority of content consumption away from print and towards digital platforms. That said, the idea that print will “die” anytime soon is out of place. Digital is valuable to publishers, absolutely, but a lot of assumptions have been made as to what that value is.

Assumptions: Digital will be the end of print

First and foremost, there is an impression that digital is a “silver bullet” that can slay the print publication industry, and that digital and online titles are the only ones that will survive. If this were the case, there would be fewer print titles today than there were 25 years ago. The opposite is actually the case. Niche publications are storming the market, providing more printed content than ever.

Now there is definitely a lot of digital influence with these new titles, like websites and social media, but the money and effort are still in the print. Digital did not break the print publication industry; it actually helped it evolve towards more topic-focused and localized titles.

Assumptions: Digital means giving away content for free

Second on the assumptions list is that digital for publishers means “giving away your content for free.” For some reason, publishers have come to the conclusion that digital is the enemy of print because it involves putting all of the print content onto websites and social media in a manner that provides no return. Digital platforms provide all sorts of return if they used well. Publishers that do nothing but repost their stories online miss all the actual opportunity digital provides.

There are ad spaces to sell, new formats of content available to leverage, and entirely new audiences to discover. Digital does involve distributing your content, but there is nothing about digital that says you have to give it away with no return or not making money from it. In fact, if a publisher is “giving it away for free,” they are missing out on almost all of what digital is capable of providing.

Assumptions: Younger generations prefer digital to print

Lastly, there are assumptions that newer generations, due to the influence of digital, are reading less editorial content. This is because micro-content (like a Facebook post or Tweet) are a huge part of the digital platform culture. However, this assumption is incorrect.

Research shows that millennials are actually print’s largest and fastest-growing market. This is due to the fact that they are highly exposed to digital, and print provides them with a tactile component that is greatly missing from their normal lives. Also, print ads are native and a natural part of a print publication. This greatly differs from digital ads, which are disruptive. This backs up the fact that print that targets this generation also sees higher engagement with print advertisement.

To top this all off, while millennials are using print, baby boomers are really pushing into digital. Facebook’s largest age demographic is the 55+ group. Also, with age, ease of access is key, and digital solutions are far more versatile for people with poor vision, lack of motor skills, and other factors that come into consideration with age. Essentially, the market is moving towards print for the young and digital for the mature, further defending that print is not going anywhere.

Further Information

To see Printing Impressions‘ 10 things we got wrong about publishing in the digital age, click here.

If you want more great content from Publication Printers, click here.

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AI for Publishers: Getting More by Doing Less

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Artificial Intelligence, or AI, has a novel sense of fear around it. Science fiction for decades has created this idea that AI leads to robots taking over the world, but the reality of AI is quite different. Rather than sentient machines, AI is actually a programmatic tool. You tell it what to do and set the parameters, and it does the work for you.

For most magazine publishers, this can be an incredibly useful tool to leverage and provide in-house improvements. Small staffs and limited time strap a lot of publications from thriving. Artificial intelligence has the means to take a lot of the remedial work out of the equation. It can be used to measure search engine optimization (SEO) and improve search rankings. It also can generate feeds of relevant articles or quotations from the internet to fact check and leverage for editorial. Further, AI allows a publisher to distribute digital content on the right channels at the audiences’ preferred times.

Artificial intelligence also provides publishers with another valuable result: improved engagement and ROI. A recent study by Blueshift, entitled “ROI of AI Marketing: 4 Levers for Cross-Channel Success,” showed that AI-driven marketing was leading to higher engagement rates and ROI. Some specific metrics from the study include:

  • Algorithms improvements from Artificial intelligence average a 28% lift in subscription upgrades and form fills.
  • Artificial intelligence content recommendations average a 200%+ lift for email engagement.
  • Artificial intelligence time optimizations average a 400%+ lift for mobile push engagement.

This study is one of many supporting the capabilities of artificial intelligence, not just for publishers, but across any number of industries. In fact, AI has become an entire industry in itself, focused on improving processes for online and offline work. As stated earlier, AI is something to be used to increase output, effectiveness, engagement, and return, not to be feared.

Further Information

To see the results of a recent AI study on marketing and engagement, click hereTo learn more about how AI is reshaping the pressrooms for digital publications, click here.

If you want more great content from Publication Printers, click here.

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USPS proposes new prices for 2019

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The United States Postal Service (USPS) recently submitted new prices to the Postal Regulatory Commission (PRC). These proposed price changes, should they be approved, would take effect on January 27, 2019. The proposed price changes will raise Mailing Services product prices by approximately 2.5%. There would also be changes to Shipping Services pricing, though this would vary by product.

Cause for the changes can be greatly attributed to the current market conditions. The Governors of the Postal Service feel that these new rates will help keep USPS competitive, while also providing needed revenue for the postal service.

One of the largest impacts to the American public, which includes publishers, would be a change in stamp prices. A 5-cent increase to First-Class Mail Forever stamp has been proposed, from 50 cents to 55 cents, but the “additional ounce” pricing would be reduced to 15 cents. This means stamped letters over 2 ounces will have a higher stamp cost but have reduced shipping rates.

Further Information

For more information on the proposed USPS postal prices for 2019, click here. To see the slides from the price change proposal webinar from USPS, click here.

If you want more great content from Publication Printers, click here.

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PPC 2018 Holiday Freight & Office Hours

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Publication Printers Corp., like many companies in the United States, will be observing the upcoming holiday season. This entails altering freight and office hours on and around the dates of each holiday. Below are the changes and special hours to be observed on the stated holidays:

Thanksgiving

Publication Printers Corp. will be closed on Thursday, November 22 (Thanksgiving Day).

For freight, all vendors will be closed both Thursday, November 22 and Friday, November 23. No freight will be moving on these days and the weekend that follows. Therefore, freight picked up on Wednesday, November 21 will not be delivered to a two-day point until November 27. Parties can also expect early and/or limited pick up on Wednesday, November 21.

Christmas

Publication Printers Corp. will be closed on Tuesday, December 25 (Christmas Day).

For freight, all vendors will be closed both Monday, December 24 and Tuesday, December 25. Normal pick up and deliveries will resume on Wednesday, December 26. There will also be limited freight movement the weekend before December 22 and 23.

New Years

Publication Printers Corp. will be closed on Tuesday, January 1 (New Years Day).

For freight, there will be extremely limited freight service available on Monday, December 31. Be extremely cautious using this day as a shipping/receiving day, because most vendors will be closed. All vendors will be closed on Tuesday, January 1. Normal pick up and deliveries will resume on January 2.

Further Information

For more information on Publication Printers Corp., click here and or call 303-936-0303.

If you want more great content from Publication Printers, click here.

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9 Types of “Digital” Publishers Can Monetize

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Print is not going anywhere! Publishers have had advertisements in their titles long enough to prove that ad profits mostly come from print. In today’s market, where ads are how publishers make their margins, print needs to be the focus. That said, making additional revenue by incorporating digital is key in today’s blended media market.

Digital content is versatile. First, digital allows publishers to create more editorial and imagery. Second, publishers can use digital to help drive subscriptions and distribution. Lastly, publishers can incorporate new types of content. However, most publishers are still skeptical about digital because their focus is print. Publishers feel they have to sacrifice time, energy, and money from print to make digital feasible.

So how can publishers feel more comfortable dedicating time, energy, and money into a digital strategy? The best way is to look at how other publishers are monetizing digital successfully. Each publisher may be unique, but trends and concepts cross over the entire market, and there are plenty of publishers marrying print and digital well. These 9 types of digital are tried and true examples of this.

A. Website Related “Digital”

1. Digital Editions

Digital editions provide instantaneous access to the printed content through mobile and electronic devices. For that ease of access, publishers can easily apply a premium or upsell existing subscriptions. Also, the final print file and the file for a digital edition can be identical. Publishers upload their file, add additional links, pages, or other added media, and a digital edition is ready in as fast as 5 minutes.

Great example: 805 Living

2. Paywalls and Web Gates

Not every publication uses a paid content or subscription model for their print titles. That does not mean the digital content has to follow that same model. Websites provide ease of access and the opportunity to include additional content. That ease and extra content extend beyond the traditional offerings of a print publication, so charging for that luxury is normal. A publisher could use digital subscriptions or micro-transactions to monetize accessing exactly what the reader wants.

Great example: Albuquerque the Magazine

3. Applications

Applications combine the best of a website and digital edition, and are customized for a mobile device. It offers the ideal delivery of all content by a publisher to their audience. Apps deliver all formats of content, ads, and notifications in a controlled and branded environment. Apps also deliver in a free, freemium (it is free for some features but paid for others), or paid (costs money to download or has a monthly subscription) capacity, based on the publisher’s choice.

Great example: National Geographic

B. Connection-Related “Digital”

4. Social Media

Originally designed for recreational connection online, social media platforms have become the largest hubs of online traffic. They are the place with the largest amount of content consumption in the world. That means publishers should be using social media. Distribution of content is the obvious use, linking to the website and original editorial. The other option is to actually sell ad space on social. Creating posts for advertisers is very similar to selling sponsored content. Another option is selling ads on social media ad networks. These ads are not limited to social media, but can extend across the internet to find the relevant audience. Also, since these ads do not show up as a post, a publisher’s editorial posting is not muddled by ads.

Great example: BUILD Magazine – Big Sky

5. Email

Emails are still highly effective, and email platforms are easy to monetize and make profitable. Emails also are versatile (birthdays, holidays, events, special sales, etc.). If a publisher is doing subscriptions with email part of their required information, it is easy to build an initial mailing list. For monetization, it is easy to sell sponsorships of newsletters, put ads in a sidebar of an email, and use email to distribute offers and calls-to-action.

Great example: 5280 Magazine

C. Content-Related “Digital”

6. Video Content

As an alternative content format, video is one of the more-easily monetized forms of digital. Videos can supplement a print or web story. They can provide exclusive, additional content (upsold if done well). They can be used for education in the form of “how-to” videos. Also, they can be used as ads or promotional content. Publishers can even curate 3rd-party video related to their audience or stories, skipping the cost of making video content altogether.

Great example: Thrasher Magazine

7. Podcasts

Like video, podcasts are another type of content to leverage. On a podcast, everything is pre-recorded, giving publishers full editorial control. Podcasts are also streamable online or downloadable for offline consumption. They are affordable to produce, averaging $200 an episode. They are also easy to upsell to advertisers for two reasons. First, audio ads, like radio, get a lot of attention. Second, publishers can sell to an advertiser the option of being the podcast story; the publisher interviews the advertiser and lets them promote themselves.

Great example: Discover Magazine

8. Sponsored Content

Thought leaders, influencers, and other content generators are everywhere and seeking opportunities to be published. Externally-produced content can be tailored to any audience upon request. Also, publishers can sell sponsored content spaces for “advertorial” purposes. The sponsor would pay to have their promotional copy included amongst the editorial content. Publishers publish it for a profit.

Great example: GPS World and North Coast Media

9. Augmented Reality

Whoever said print itself does not have the power to be digital is wrong. Augmented reality provides the ability to turn any print publication into a multimedia powerhouse by overlaying other content formats (video, podcasts, imagery, etc.) over the print. It is invisible to the eye, but with a mobile device, all that additional content comes to life. The easiest way to monetize it is to sell it to an advertiser. Now the print ad can link to a website, direct straight to online products, or have virtual tours and examples. Publishers can also use it to provide additional content that could not fit in the print.

Great example: USA Today

Further Information

For more information on how publishers can monetize digital, click here and here.

If you want more great content from Publication Printers, click here.

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Ideal Ways Publishers Can Monetize Video

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In today’s multimedia world, there is an argument that content should be moving towards digital platforms. This includes, podcasts, blogs, and video. This really is not the case. The reality for most publishers is that the money is in the print. Thus, print is here to stay so long as that is the case. That said, it does not mean digital cannot provide further profits and additional touchpoints.

Video is the ideal example of this. The medium is the antithesis of print, which is why they are a perfect pairing for publishers. Content that print can cover video can, and visa versa. The same content covered in both forms has different feels and reaches audiences in different ways. Most important of all: they are the most versatile forms of content. They can both be distributed in numerous digital formats. Both can also be transformed into other formats, including having the audio stripped for podcasts and radio or text for blurbs and blogs.

Now print is already in a publisher’s wheelhouse, but video is not, especially when it comes to magazines. That means using video, let alone monetizing it, takes a lot of research and energy and trial-and-error. That said, there are some general ways to monetize video that publishers can take from other industries.

Creating subscriber-only videos

Many publications already use a subscription model to help increase revenue. Those that do not still understand the concept. Create unique editorial content, then tell audiences that if they want it, pay for it. Video is simply another form of content, so creating a gateway on a website or using private, subscriber groups on social media to make that content exclusive to subscribers is an easy jump for a publisher to make.

There are two ways to approach subscription-only videos. The first way is to tether the video into your existing subscription setup, meaning the videos would complement the editorial and be a part of your standard offerings to any subscriber. The other way is to make the videos under their own subscription, which is ideal if the publication is free or if the video content is 100% original and distinct from the editorial.

Bring editorial to life with live-stream

Video is not limited to the pre-record, edit, and distribute method. News coverage has done live coverage for decades, but it is now available to the average persona and organization, including publishers. Live-stream allows for instant coverage of a story, which can be great for timely pieces, as well as a round-up session where a publisher talks about the newest issue and top stories and so forth. It can also be used to add uniqueness to editorial and keep it active, even after the piece is publishers. Simply keep hosting new live-streams on that story’s page, and traffic will keep coming.

Publishers can also leverage live-stream on a subscription-boosting basis by putting access to the live coverage behind the subscription paywall. For example, you create this great editorial on an athlete, but you are doing a live interview with them too. The story goes up for free, but to access the interview live, or even the recordings afterward, you have to be a subscriber.

Educate the audience with video

Video courses are one of the most consumed things on the internet, and publishers have the opportunity to take control of that market. Publishers are constantly generating useful content that has an educational or recreational value to audiences. Changing that format slightly, or reformatting after publishing, to provide even more insight and education is easy with video. Better yet, let your advertisers do it. Then you get the benefits of video content related to your editorial, you didn’t have to create it, and you got paid for it.

Digital offers or partially-gated videos that offer educational value also help drive subscriptions. If the video is captivating and useful, and the audience can only access the first 3 minutes without a subscription, you’re likely to get people subscribing.

Further Information

For more information on how publishers can leverage and monetize videos, click here.

If you want more great content from Publication Printers, click here.

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Podcasts & Publications: Take Your Content to a New Level

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The word “publisher” has evolved drastically in the past 25 years. Once a term reserved for printed works, the advent of the internet has now taken publishers into entirely new media. One particular medium that has garnered extreme success for publishers is the podcast. A hybrid between radio and blogging, podcasts focus on educational or entertaining content, often featuring guests to provide validity and expertise.

In terms of success, iTunes alone recorded it 50 millionth podcast stream earlier this year. Podcasts average an 80% complete listen rate (80% of people that start a podcast finish or almost finish it), according to the 2018 Infinite Dial report. Also, the Interactive Advertising Bureau stated that in 2017, the U.S. podcasting industry reached $314 million in revenue, an 86% increase over the $ 169 million in 2016.

Now, what does this have to do with print publications, like magazines?

Use podcasts to make the most of your existing content

Magazines and timely print publications crank out more content than any other publishers. This means on top of the constant flow of new stories, there are ever-growing archives.

Archives are full of great content that should be leveraged, but taking dated content and make it relevant again is not a simple task.
Many opt for the “throw it up on social media” plan or add a boilerplate to every new story that links to the archives. These do make your archives easier to discover, but they don’t make your archives more relevant.

A more successful solution is to switch up the format of the content. This is where podcasts can come in. Look through your archives for stories that follow a theme, and curate a podcast series of your old stories. With a few minor adjustments and improvements to the content, it is easy to turn an existing editorial piece into a podcast story. Reaching out to the original sources for quotes or soundbites is great too.

These podcasts are entirely new content and will reach your existing audience and new audiences. They can also increase site traffic in two ways: publishing the podcast on the front page, and publish each podcast stories on the web pages of the original story.

Generate new content that print can’t cover with podcasts

Two of the most powerful forms of communication are the written word and imagery, but there is some content better suited for other types of media. Video and radio are long-standing options to cover the other content, but podcasts have become just as viable an option, possibly an even better one due to one thing: money.

To do video and radio right, a high-end studio and off-site equipment can be tens of thousands of dollars upfront. Even if doing the bare basics, both involve decent spend to produce, and then there are distribution costs on top of that.

Podcasts serve as a much more affordable solution. For a publisher looking to do it on a budget, a podcast can be produced for a few hundred up front and less than $100 a month (outside of time spent). To do the high-end podcast, $1000 upfront and a little over $300 a month after that.

Best of all, podcasts are extremely versatile content. They can live on a website, be on a radio, be used in video, and be downloadable or streamable. Also, audio is the easiest format content to consume, as it requires little to no effort, and can reach people on the go, like drivers.
Building a brand and audience takes an immense amount of effort. Publishers know that best, as they dedicate a lot of time and money building a sizable circulation.

Podcasts provide an instantaneous audience and distribution

Fear of having to start building an audience from scratch often keeps publishers from delving into other media platforms. It’s logical; if the existing print or online audience is not there, it is hard to justify the effort of making unique content to dedicating energy deliver it on those other platforms.

Podcasts escape both the issue of building a new audience and delivering the content. Actually, both issues are resolved by the same solution: where podcasts live. Almost all podcasts are hosted and delivered on high-profile applications, like iTunes, Stitcher, and Google’s podcast app.

A massive pool of people utilize these applications, and that pool covers almost every demographic and geographic group. The likelihood that a publisher’s audience already has a presence in that pool is very high. Not to mention, these people are already seeking content via podcast, and all congregated in one place.

Newer, more creative advertising options thanks to podcasts

Almost every publication makes its margins off advertisement, so more advertising options is a fast way to a publisher’s heart.

On top of the traditional commercial spots, podcasts provide prime placement for sponsored content. Interview an advertiser as a podcast story. Review a product. You can even run a print story with it to upsell the opportunity. Best of all, because it is recorded, you have full control of the script, even in an interview. You also have the ability to sell sponsorship for the podcast, offsetting the costs of the podcast and generates even more profits.

Further Information

For more information regarding podcast opportunities for publishers, click here. To learn more about podcast industry statistics, click here. Further details on why podcasts should fit into your content strategy are available if you click here.

If you want more great content from Publication Printers, click here.

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It’s a niche magazine market

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Large, national titles continue to struggle

The question of “is print dead” is still circulating around the magazine industry. However, it is the larger, more general-topic titles that are finding themselves truly pinched and struggling. Smaller, more specific titles, commonly called “niche,” are actually growing and expanding. Dedicated, specific audiences are the driving force behind this. They aren’t just consumers of content, but advocates that actively promote and support these titles. Titles that cover a wider demographic and geographic spread do not have that same buy-in from their audiences.

Titles that rely on their longstanding brands are having difficulty retaining audiences against the targeted content of niche publications. In fact, new niche titles are being created to fill the gaps being left by the larger titles. The other major component as to why larger titles are having issues: profits. The brand loyalty issue results in fewer subscriptions, which when combined with paper cost increases and shipping difficulty, all lead to struggles balancing profits and overhead.

Niche titles can skate some of these issues due to the audience buy-in, which helps bring in subscription and ad dollars. Also, smaller circulations means less print and fulfillment cost. Being niche doesn’t resolve the issues, but it helps in today’s market. Difficulty for all titles will likely continue unless industry-wide changes occur. In the meantime, niche publications will continue to expand their reach.

The Playboy Magazine Example

Playboy magazine is an example of this. Still one of the most recognizable titles in the US, it’s once 5.6 million circulation has now dwindled to below 500,000, and what was once a monthly will be a quarterly in 2019. Much of the change happening at Playboy can be attributed to a decrease in brand loyalty over the last 10 years.

The Chief Creative Officer of Playboy, Cooper Hefner, has even expressed that he plans to put more focus into online content, in an effort to “shift away from putting a lot of effort into the magazine” because of a lack of profits from the print publication.

Further Information

For more information regarding the success of niche publications, click here. To learn more about the changes to Playboy magazine, click here.

If you want more great content from Publication Printers, click here.

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SAPPI’s Ideas that Matter contest is back!

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SAPPI — one of the world’s most recognizable providers of dissolving wood pulp, paper pulp, paper-based solutions and biorefinery solutions — holds an annual contest that combines creative design and activism. Called the “Ideas that Matter” program, the contest provides recognition and support to designers that partner with organizations to bring great ideas to life. Over the course of 19 years, SAPPI has given out $13 million in grants to assist over 500 charities.

The process for each Ideas that Matter contest is simple. First, designers come up with a non-profit they want to support or develop an entirely original activism idea. Next, they create one or more design collateral pieces to submit that market and call to action that non-profit or cause. Then they submit, and SAPPI goes through and picks a few to dedicate funds towards supporting or bringing to reality.

The 2018 submission term for Ideas that Matter just ended, with entries needing to have been postmarked by July 18, 2018. However, that doesn’t mean you can’t start brainstorming for next year! Designers are a busy bunch and time is hard to come by, so start focusing your efforts on your ideas and cause, and you can be well prepared when the 2019 term rolls around (and we will remind you too!)

If you already submitted, judging will take place this August and the official winners will be released in October, and should you win, you’ll have six months to bring the project you designed to life.

For more information about the Ideas that Matter program, last year’s winners, or SAPPI, click here.

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